Hummingbird Nectar

8 Comments

Hummingbird Nectar Recipe ~ From Vegetate, Vegan Cooking & Food Blog

“A leaf fluttered in through the window this morning, as if supported by the rays of the sun, a bird settled on the fire escape, joy in the task of coffee, joy accompanied me as I walked.”Anais Nin

This sweet little lady came by for a drink this morning. In fact, we’ve gotten visits from many different hummingbirds every day since we put up our feeder. We wanted to support our local hummingbird population because many hummingbirds species are threatened by habitat loss, predators, and disease, and because they are so darned cute! ;)

We bought a wonderful hummingbird feeder that is made from recycled glass in Mexico, filled it up with homemade hummingbird nectar (simple recipe here), and within a couple of weeks our backyard was one of the main stops on our local “hummingbird highway.”

We purchased a red glass feeder so we wouldn’t have to use artificial red dye in our homemade nectar. Hummingbirds are attracted to the color red, so in the past many people dyed their nectar using FD&C Red #2 food coloring, which is now a known carcinogen. If you just get a red feeder or one with red accents you don’t have to worry about dying your nectar. It is so much fun to watch the birds come for a drink every day. This feeder has turned me into a real bird-watcher!

Here are some great tips on other ways to support hummingbird conservation.

Hummingbird Fact: Hummingbirds are highly intelligent and can remember every flower they have been to, and how long it will take each flower to refill.

8 thoughts on “Hummingbird Nectar

  1. Hummingbirds are small, colorful birds with iridescent feathers. Their name comes from the fact that they flap their wings so fast (about 80 times per second) that they make a humming noise. Hummingbirds can fly right, left, up, down, backwards, and even upside down. They are also able to hover by flapping their wings in a figure-8 pattern. They have a specialized long and tapered bill that is used to obtain nectar from the center of long, tubular flowers. The hummingbird’s feet are used for perching only, and are not used for hopping or walking.

    • This is such wonderful information Mihran, thank you! I didn’t know that hummingbirds only use their feet for perching, not for walking or hopping. I also wasn’t aware that they can fly upside down and backwards, what incredible birds!

      • Please allow me to thank you for responding back to my message, I appreciate it. I would like to apologize for not responding back to your message, while I was having few concerts with my musical band!

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