California Benedict with Sriracha-Chive Hollandaise

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California Benedict with Sriracha-Chive Hollandaise ~ From Vegetate, Vegan Cooking and Food Blog

“Hot sauce must be hot. If you don’t like it hot, use less.”David Tran, creator of Sriracha Hot Sauce.

This hot-hot-hot version of a vegan eggs benny was to die for! It was made with a spicy, gingery, super-rich sriracha cream sauce over marinated grilled tofu, served atop sliced yellow heirloom tomatoes and toasted English muffins with a side of roasted purple Peruvian potatoes with a lime and garlic aioli. This recipe was surprisingly simple to prepare, and because it was so good and since I loooooooove sriracha sauce, this is going to be my go-to tofu benedict recipe from now on.

The recipe is from the fantastic The Veggie-Lover’s Sriracha Cookbook by Randy Clemens, page 69.

Sriracha Facts: Sriracha, the Thai hot sauce pronounced sir-rotch-ah and also known as “rooster sauce”, was created by 66-year-old David Tran. Thank you, Mr. Tran!

A Slow-Cooked Tandoori Feast

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Tandoori Feast ~ From Vegetate, Vegan Cooking & Food Blog

“There is more to life than increasing its speed.”Mahatma Gandhi

For this sumptuous feast we slow-cooked Tandoori Baked Tofu and Tandoori Spiced Potatoes with Spinach from Carla Kelly’s book Quick and Easy Vegan Slow Cooking, pages 118 and 112 respectively, and served them alongside Coconut Rice (page 216) and some warm Spelt Chapatis from Laura Matthias’ ExtraVeganZa, page 137.

I am crazy about the rich, spicy flavors of these Indian dishes. Slow cooking is a nice, low-maintenance way to cook because once your ingredients are heating up in the cooker you can literally walk away for 6-8 hours until your food is ready to eat! No fuss, no muss, no burnt food. We enjoy slow-cooking food so much at our house that we have two slow-cookers, which we used to make both of these Tandoori dishes. Next time we’ll have to make some yummy mango chutney, too!

Both the Tandoori Baked Tofu and Tandoori Spiced Potatoes with Spinach are grain-free.

Tandoori Fact: Tandoori cooking is named after a tandoor, which is a high-temperature cylindrical clay oven in which foods are cooked. Our slow cooker has a red clay pot (pictured above), which really enhances the richness of the flavors.

Red Cherry Plum Jam

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Red Cherry Plum Jam ~ From Vegetaet, Vegan Cooking & Food Blog

“That’s why I hate to get started in these jam sessions. I’m always the last one to leave.”Elvis Presley

We recently made jars and jars of red cherry plum jam with the help of our backyard cherry plum trees using this recipe.

There is something so fundamentally satisfying about putting up foods from your own garden. Making jam is easy to do, and you can make a year’s worth in just a few hours for pennies once you’ve purchased the jars.

Canned foods will keep for an indefinite period of time as long as the seal is intact and they have been properly processed.

Canning Facts: Frenchman Nicholas Appert developed the method for preserving food that we call canning in 1809.  He used glass jars sealed with corks held in place with wire.

Tempeh and Barley-Stuffed Cabbage Rolls

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Tempeh and Barley-Stuffed Cabbage Rolls ~ From Vegetate, Vegan Cooking & Food Blog

“The time has come,” the Walrus said, to talk of many things: of shoes–and ships–and sealing-wax–of cabbages–and kings–and why the sea is boiling hot–and whether pigs have wings.”Lewis Carroll, from Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, 1872

These sweet & savory cabbage rolls were filled with tempeh, barley, carrots, onions, and dill, cooked in a tangy tomato sauce, topped with fresh heirloom tomatoes and served over Yukon Gold mashed potatoes.

From Robin Robertson’s wonderful cookbook Fresh from the Vegetarian Slow Cooker, page 161.

Slow cooking really brings out the flavors in food and makes foods like these so tender they just melt in your mouth.

Cabbage Fact: Cultures in which cabbage is a staple food, such as in Poland and some parts of China, show a low incidence of breast cancer. Research suggests this is due to the protective effect of sulfur-containing compounds in cabbage.

Artichoke Ricotta Tortellini with Saffron Cream Sauce and Roasted Potatoes with Asparagus

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Artichoke Ricotta Tortellini with Saffron Cream Sauce ~ From Vegetate, Vegan Cooking $ Food Blog
“If your mother cooks Italian food, why should you go to a restaurant?”
Martin Scorsese

I have wanted to make this recipe for ages, but I held off because I am always a bit intimidated by the idea of making fresh pasta. It is easy to make the dough, but it can be time-consuming to make individual, filled pastas like ravioli and tortellini. Fresh tortellini has always been my favorite type of pasta though, so I finally relented. The cream sauce for this recipe also contains saffron, one of my favorite flavors!

Making these tortellini actually wasn’t difficult at all. It was kind of fun. We doubled the recipe and ended up making 200 tortellini, so we were able to freeze some to enjoy later.

The filling mainly consisted of artickoke hearts, garlic, white wine, and cashew cream. The sauce was a rich combination of shallots, white wine, cashew cream, saffron, and Earth Balance dairy-free butter.

Served tossed with fresh arugula and tomatoes, with a side of roasted potatoes and asparagus with smoked salt and pepper. From Tal Ronnen’s The Conscious Cook, page 164.

Tortellini Fact: Because of it’s shape, tortellini is also called “belly button” pasta.